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Old 07-10-2009, 01:12 AM   #1
jjohnston7

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Sub Box too big?

Can a Subwoofer Box be too big? I have 2 10" Infinity Perfect 10.1 subs. The specs say a .6 cu box. I bought a box custom built to fit the car, but the chambers are 1.24 cu ft. I can build a small box to take up space inside if needed, but wanted to see if that was needed.

If a box can be too big, what effect will it have?
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Old 07-10-2009, 01:20 AM   #2
91Chevy

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It will make the subs less punchy, and make them have more of a boomy sound/feel to them. You can put something on the inside of the box to take up space if you feel it's needed.
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Old 07-10-2009, 01:29 AM   #3
jjohnston7

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Ok, are the manufacturer specs usually accurate? I have a friend who told me never to go with what the manufacturer says, and that I should design my own size... Any thoughts on that?
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Old 07-10-2009, 01:30 AM   #4
91Chevy

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjohnston7 View Post
Ok, are the manufacturer specs usually accurate? I have a friend who told me never to go with what the manufacturer says, and that I should design my own size... Any thoughts on that?
If you have the exact parameters and know how to calculate the proper size, go for it. Otherwise you can email the manufacturer and ask what they recommend.
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Old 07-10-2009, 02:37 AM   #5
basicxj

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjohnston7 View Post
Can a Subwoofer Box be too big? I have 2 10" Infinity Perfect 10.1 subs. The specs say a .6 cu box. I bought a box custom built to fit the car, but the chambers are 1.24 cu ft. I can build a small box to take up space inside if needed, but wanted to see if that was needed.

If a box can be too big, what effect will it have?
Yes a box can be too big...the effect that has in your specific setup will depend on the characteristics of your woofers, the amp you're using and your listening habits.

Some generalities for you:

- the larger enclosure will play louder than the smaller one (given the same input power).

- the woofers will better handle their rated RMS power in the enclosure built to spec...power handling suffers if the box is too large, as their is too much air (and not enough damping force) to allow proper control of the woofer's cone.

- it is easier to drive a sub to (and past) it's excursion limit in an enclosure that's too large...thermal or mechanical damage to your woofers is easier tyo cause if the box is too big by a large margin.

- subs subjected to aggressive use will be better served/live longer in an enclosure of the correct volume.

I would suggest trying your subs out in the enclosure you have already- depending on the range of sizes recommended by the manufacturer you might be just fine...many times subs perform better in an enclosure slightly larger than spec'd by the manufacturer. Set gains on your amp conservatively, and try not to clip it's output or "get on" the volume for extended periods until you know how th subs react, especially if you have more power on-tap than the subs are rated for. If the subs are too easily driven past desireable excursion limits or start getting too hot, you can put material inside the enclosure (like 2x4s, books etc.) to displace some of the air and show your subs less internal volume.

You can download enclosure design software like WinSD, Bassbox Pro etc. to model how your subs will perform in various types and sizes of enclosure...look up and plug in your subs' T/S parameters into the software, add size variables and voila- you can see how the size difference affects things before going ahead and making any changes.


PS- usually a "custom" enclosure refers to one built to the exact specs your subs require .
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Old 07-10-2009, 12:38 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by basicxj View Post

- the larger enclosure will play louder than the smaller one (given the same input power).
Always wondered about this. You have a link explaining this basic?
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Old 07-10-2009, 05:03 PM   #7
basicxj

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Quote:
Originally Posted by skatforninezero View Post
Always wondered about this. You have a link explaining this basic?

As 91Chevy mentioned (as I was typing my response), smaller enclosures have more output in the higher frequencies (in the "punchy" zone) while larger enclosures have more output down low (in the "boomy" zone). An enclosure that's too small will have a peak in the higher frequencies at the expense of low frequency output and reduced overall output, while an enclosure that's too large will have a peak down low and overall greater efficiency due to less damping force applied by the internal air spring from air trapped in the enclosure.

I don't have a link to "prove it" to you, but experience has taught me that larger enclosures play louder than smaller ones when all other things are equal...to prove it to yourself, download some enclosure design software, input specs for a specific woofer and see what happens on the graph as enclosure size is increased but power remains constant .
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Old 07-10-2009, 07:56 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by basicxj View Post
As 91Chevy mentioned (as I was typing my response), smaller enclosures have more output in the higher frequencies (in the "punchy" zone) while larger enclosures have more output down low (in the "boomy" zone). An enclosure that's too small will have a peak in the higher frequencies at the expense of low frequency output and reduced overall output, while an enclosure that's too large will have a peak down low and overall greater efficiency due to less damping force applied by the internal air spring from air trapped in the enclosure.

I don't have a link to "prove it" to you, but experience has taught me that larger enclosures play louder than smaller ones when all other things are equal...to prove it to yourself, download some enclosure design software, input specs for a specific woofer and see what happens on the graph as enclosure size is increased but power remains constant .
here is a good link load the first subwoofer manual http://www.soundstream.com/owner-manuals.htm
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Old 10-05-2013, 03:00 PM   #9
vuduchild

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Hello, I am an idiot

I have a similar question. I bought a Box that is a custom fit for my GMC truck. When I first looked at them, one had an amp shelf and had .85 CF for each sub, with the driver displacement (guessing at .1) .75. My subs (Two JL 10wx-4) specs tell me .65. Great, I could live with .1
Instead, being the super genius I am, I bought the one with out the shelf (not checking the volume) and it has 1.13 CF per driver.
Can anyone with a better grasp of mathematics tell me how much 1/2-3/4 MDF I need to add to get the required air space?
The subs are matched to a JL 500.1
This is the box:
http://subthump.com/product_info.php...products_id=25

Thank you for your time,

Vudu

Last edited by vuduchild; 10-05-2013 at 03:02 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old 10-05-2013, 11:31 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vuduchild View Post
I have a similar question. I bought a Box that is a custom fit for my GMC truck. When I first looked at them, one had an amp shelf and had .85 CF for each sub, with the driver displacement (guessing at .1) .75. My subs (Two JL 10wx-4) specs tell me .65. Great, I could live with .1
Instead, being the super genius I am, I bought the one with out the shelf (not checking the volume) and it has 1.13 CF per driver.
Can anyone with a better grasp of mathematics tell me how much 1/2-3/4 MDF I need to add to get the required air space?
The subs are matched to a JL 500.1
This is the box:
http://subthump.com/product_info.php...products_id=25

Thank you for your time,

Vudu
Manufactures recommended enclosures are generally too small, but not always, so we really need to know what sub you have (a link to the manufacture's webpage for the sub helps). Once we've looked at the specs then we can get a better grasp on just how much space it does or doesn't need.
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