CarAudioForum.com


Reply
Old 01-26-2006, 07:22 AM   #1
sprackydoo

Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: "a 40oz to freedom is the only chance I have to feel good even though I feel bad" Sublime
Posts: 3,680
sprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond repute



Guide to install tools!

THIS THREAD IS UNDER CONSTANT CONSTRUCTION

This thread is intended to let newbs and intermediate installers know what tools you need what tools you want and i'll also list a few tools for people like me who buy tools just to have more tools I'll try to make the list as complete as possible (for non fab installs after I get the kinks worked out on the current list and everyone agrees i'll go into fab) If you can think of anything I left out let me know and I will edit it into this post. Any brand that I recommend is solely on what i've had "luck" with, i'm sure there are many more tool manuf. that I have not listed, make a post and I will add what you
suggest into this post for easy access. This will be a never ending thread i'm throwing this out there and editing it as I go along, all respectfull suggestions will be added.

  • Storage
    storage, storage is dependent upon your tool coolection. Most all non-fab installs can be done out of a single decent sized tool bag available from Craftsman, MAC, matco, Snap-on and many others. If you need more storage move up to a roll-away box that fits your needs Craftsman MAC matco snap-on BTW Snap-On MAC and matco will take trade-ins later down the road when you outgrow it (they are expensive though)
Basic hand tools:
  • sockets/ratchets , absolutely necessary! I recommend you get 4-19mm and 7/32-3/4 in both shallow and deep these should be easy to find in a basic 1/4 and 3/8 (drive) set. I also recommend you get a few doubles in commonly used sockets and doubles and different styles of ratchets (due to the low torque of most mobile installs I recommend a high tooth count ratchet) and a few various length extensions in each frive size. The usual craftsman mac matco snap-on also Kobalt (lowes) Husky (Home depot) and SK Facom oh btw i've BTW heard people complain that the black Kobalt sockets/ratchets scratch easily.
    example: Socket set

  • Wrenches, necessary i've done well with the longer ones but some people swear you need the stubbies in addition (same sizes as above soxkets) Craftsman mac matco snap-on etc.. (also gear wrench ratcheting wrenches i've had luck with)
    example: Wrenches
  • Allen "hex" key wrenchesMostly used on set screws on amplifiers and battery terminals so this tool is necessary! What you choose depends on what you like, personally I have one of every style. Some people like the t-handle others the individual keys and others the fold out set of keys, both SAE and Metric are needed.example
  • pliers necessary there are many types of wrenches you should have at least a few channellocks crescent wrenches vise-grips needle-nose etc.. channellock, crescent, vise-grip (irwin), Klein, SK facom, and the usual craftsman (proffessional) snap-on mac matco
    examples
    Pliers
    Chanellocks
    Vise-Grips
    Adjustable wrench
    Needle-nose
  • Torx bits , these are not used to often (pretty much just seat belts and seat mounts) so no need to go all out craftsman is fine
    example: Torx bits
  • Nut drivers : Not completely a necessity 9 times out of 10 a socket and an extension will get it
    Nut drivers
  • Screwdrivers , basic screwdriver set (10 pc or so) craftsman pro, klein, kobalt, husky, snap-on mac, matco whatever fits best. I recommend a nice ratcheting screwdriver too (snap-on mac wera)
    a skewdriver is nice if you have a power drill but can't quite get into where you need to be. I only have experience with a milwaukee no problems yet
    ex of skewdriver Skew driver
    A screw starter is also somethng nice to have Screw starter
    A set of security bits is useful (partsexpress.com)
  • Crimpers/strippers , There are a few different kinds of crimpers out there I myself have 4 pairs. MAC Snap-On, channellock, klein
    these: 1st style are nice general all around type, really all you need.
    these: 2nd style are nice for times when you want to tap into wires but not cut them they do this by cutting then pushing the insulation out of the way.
    these: 3rd Style allow more leverage and are easier to crimp with.
    These: 4th style
    are nice for HU install when you have a lot of wires to strip fast can take maybe 5 wires at a time: You don't need all the above crimpers the 1st style is a pretty good all-around and is all that is really absolutely needed. Also there is no need for any bigger crimpers 8awg and up can be crimped with a vice or hammer

    Cutters
    There are many types of cutters, you should at minimum have dykes (diagonal cutters) and also a mini dykes a box cutter and pocket knife are also necessary, some good big wire cutters (I like my Klein 4/0 cutters they are not necessary but they have nice leverage and the average 8awg and 8awg is easy as pie to cut with these) recommend Klein, channellock, and the usual mac matco snap-on.
    examples: Dykes
  • I cannot live w/o my wire insertion tool I bought mine BNIB on ebay! highly recommended - Wire insertion tool
  • utillity knife I like my craftsman foldout but a simple "box cutter" works utillity knife
  • Files : Not used often enough to justify expensive ones in basic installs cheap set will do
  • Pick set : Very handy when tapping into wires and not tearing up your fingers I have the tendency to lose mine so a cheap set works fine for me example: Pick set

Last edited by sprackydoo; 02-20-2006 at 05:40 AM.
sprackydoo is offline   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Help Syrian Refugees Survive. Donate Now!
Or text REFUGEES to 50555 to give $10 to USA for UNHCR
Old 01-26-2006, 07:23 AM   #2
sprackydoo

Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: "a 40oz to freedom is the only chance I have to feel good even though I feel bad" Sublime
Posts: 3,680
sprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond repute



  • Panel poppers: window crank removers, steel and nylon poppers, hook tools also recommended
    Window crank remover
    Door panel/trim removers Item No. 52296
    These are nice for NOT scratching the interior trim panels and the one on the upper right is perfect for routing satellite antenna wires:
    Nylon panel poppers Item No. 43459
    same as above but with a lil more surface area to help in NOT breaking panels: Another of the above
    Hook tool nice for all around stuff especially good for bending tabs on radio cages/sleeves Hook tool
    These are nice for those pesky little plastic rivets: Upholstery remover
    DIN removal tools
    Euro removal keys
    NOTE* You should collect keys to as many radios as possible! These keys come with every HU (btw HU = Head Unit aka cd player)
  • Tap & die sets : You should only need these if you strip out a thread, this is why I suggest a cheap (harborfreight.com) set as all you'll be doing is basically chasing threads.
    Tap & die set
  • File set Used for deburring
  • magnetizer very handy for magnetizing screwdrivers or anything else for making your life easier magnetizer
measuring equipment
  • basic tape measure , rule and square (a caliper is also nice if you know how to read it) a close tolerance isn't really needed in mobile installs cheaper stanley johnson cen-tech (harbor freight) etc.. works fine also this type of protractor is nice (more fab oriented)
Power and Pneumatic tools

I recommend Snap-On Blue point MAC matco Ingersoll-rand for air tools craftsman campbell housfield, kobalt and husky also work good Added by tuck05 Milwauke(however its spelled) also makes power tools. I own one of their sawzalls. Very nice.
  • Die grinder - nice for taking off a lot of material ex
    die grinder
  • Impact gun nice for making quick work of any serious bolt (seat mounts seat belts etc..)
  • Ratchet - good for where a gun can't go ex Air ratchet
  • Blow gun - easy cleanup ok to skimp and get a cheapy ex Blow gun

    For power tools I recommend DeWalt, Makita, Milwaukee and bosch. I strongly recommend AGAINST black and decker!!
  • Drill - I like my 14.4 DeWalt XRP drill nice torque and the smaller batteries allow the drill to get into tighter area's. Makita is more expensive but are lighter and seem more balanced (if you have a scewdriver a 90 degree angle drill is not necessary but still is nice to have) ex
    Cordless drill
  • Rotary tool : Extremely useful millions of jobs I love my dremel 395 (the cordless ones suck @ss) Roto-zip is also excellent ex Dremel
  • Hot glue gun : very useful all around, no speciffic brand comes to mind.
  • Solder gun/iron: gun/iron will electric/butane depend on what you are comfortable with I like my weller 140/100watt gun Snap-on MAC and American beauty are nice
    here's a nice butane Butane soldering iron (I recommend against cheapies as they always break speciffically the igniter)
  • Extension cords/power strips : obvious reasons no speciffic brand (also for outside work I recommend a GFCI unit)
Testing equipment:
  • DMM : definately must have one (clamp on dmm is also nice) IMO Fluke is the best the normal Craftsman snap-on mac matco apply
    DMM
  • Speaker phase tester : nice to have when you have a mess of wires and don't know where they go. recommend YOU they're not hard to make I have written a quick guide: How to make your own speaker tester
  • Power supply : Nice to have for testing amps HU's speakers etc.. an automotive battery charger or a computer power supply may also be used
  • Gloves : I use Machanix Wear exclusively!

    Disposables
  • Wire wheels , used to make a nice clean ground. I recommend some cheapies
  • Drill bits , Get a decent HSS set all the coatings (titanium etc..) tend to wear off and leave you with a HSS bit anyways (personal preference but the HSS
    looks nice for longer as it doesn't turn into 2 tone lol) IRWIN, DeWalt, Porter cable etc...
  • step drills: Makes hole without overpenetrating, Makes holes of variable diameters, Dont have to change bits for large holes, Large one will cover for a whole box of large drill bits, which is pricy. get a nice set of uni-bit (IRWIN) brand name step drills. example: Step drill
Misc.
  • battery charger Hopefully you won't need one of these but it is definately a necessary tool
  • Heat gun Used for applying sound deadener and also warming up panels to prevent them from cracking (in cold environments) cheapie harbor freight works fine for me as this is a "once in a while" tool
  • Magnetic parts dish Nice to keep screws and small tools in one spot ex magnetic parts dish

Hardware
OK not necessarilly should be in a sticky about tools but I feel these should be in every installers tool box
  • U-clips both long and short. These have endless applications couldn't live w/o them
    ex Short long
  • Pan head screws for use with u-clips expan head screws
  • Self tappers used for mounting and also useful for quickly fastening small awg wire Self tapper
  • T-nuts t-nuts along with machine screws (available at any hardware store) make mounting remounting remounting again a wonderful when it abso-fvckin-lutely has to be torqued on barbed t-nuts are the way to go (also a nice security feature as thieves don't usually carry a full set of allen wrenches
  • hardware store-house I recommend going to a local hardware store and picking up a "store house" of hardware in both SAE and metric (most are metric now a days) hardware is especially useful when you lose something in a car (hey it happens) you should have nuts, bolts and washers in as many sizes as possible.

Special thanks to 77'CJ for helping to iron out a few kinks

Last edited by sprackydoo; 02-24-2006 at 05:43 AM.
sprackydoo is offline   Reply With Quote

Old 01-27-2006, 05:16 AM   #3
sprackydoo

Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: "a 40oz to freedom is the only chance I have to feel good even though I feel bad" Sublime
Posts: 3,680
sprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond repute



Fab tools

cutting tools
  • Sawz-all - aka recip saw heavy duty version of above. Nice for making quick work of sheet metal like back dashes and "special" projects ex reciprocating saw
  • Jig saw - Used to cut stuff ex Jig saw
  • Die grinder used for cutting stuff quick fast and in a hurry



    Sanding
    Since sanding tools come in many variations I believe they deserve their own category
  • DA (dual action) sander (pneumatic) - DA sander is a must have tool. Used to take off a lot of material but dual action assures it's taken off evenly ie DA sander
  • vertical sander (pneumatic) - nice for flattening out wide flat surfaces
  • Belt sander - Model DW433 used to take off A LOT of material QUICKLY

    Hand sander - nice for flat and slightly curved areas hand sander

    Sanding block - sanding block
hand tools
  • MAPP/propane gas torch - used for bending plexi and getting stuck bolts unstuck ex gas torch
  • scrapers - for preparing work by removing corrosion etc.. Scrapers

Last edited by sprackydoo; 02-20-2006 at 05:44 AM.
sprackydoo is offline   Reply With Quote

Old 01-27-2006, 05:17 AM   #4
sprackydoo

Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: "a 40oz to freedom is the only chance I have to feel good even though I feel bad" Sublime
Posts: 3,680
sprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond repute



Fab supplies
  • Fleece stretched around a frame and fiberglass (polyester or epoxy) to make a "foundation" to fiberglass too. Availabel at any fabric store or wally world (wal-mart) it is usually cheaper to buy a fleece blanket than it is to buy the material from a fabric store.
  • resin sometimes referred to as 'glass it is NOT. It is either epoxy (expensive) or the more common polyester, polyester is available at any home improvement store and most harware stores. ie polyester resin
  • 'glass there are may types of 'glass (fiberglass) known as cloth and chopped mat, what you use is a personal thing whatever you prefer. Availabe at hd (home depot) lowes and local hardware stores ie cloth mat
  • Bondo A general term used to describe body filler. Filler is used to fill imperfections and valleys in 'glass work (since it is easier to sand) available at lowes hd local hardware store ie bondo
  • glazing putty used to fill small imperfections like scratches and pinholes super easy to sand ie spot and glazing putty
  • MDF medium Density Fiberboard, used to construct speaker enclosers available at hd and lowes Birch plywood may be substituted
  • Liquid nails a construction adhesive, this stuff will bond/seal subwoofer enclosures extemely well I prefer heavy duty

Last edited by sprackydoo; 02-19-2006 at 12:32 AM.
sprackydoo is offline   Reply With Quote

Old 02-01-2006, 06:34 AM   #5
sprackydoo

Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: "a 40oz to freedom is the only chance I have to feel good even though I feel bad" Sublime
Posts: 3,680
sprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond repute



Wood Working
Power tools
  • circular saw - Nice for working with large sheet stock too cumbersome to work on a table saw ex circ saw
  • Jig saw - Used to cut somewhat somewhat intricate shapes like holes for speakers and for cutting materials to make raised lettering ex Jig saw
  • Router - along with a circle cutting jig a router can make a perfect circle for when you need results better than a jig saw. Also nice for cutting dado, rabbit and other joints and profile ex
    Router
    Added by Geolemon Bearing kit
hand tools
Staionary tools
  • table saw - Nice for fabb'n enclosures cutting pvc pipes table saw
  • Bench grinder - if a dremel or die grinder won't do it you need one of these bench grinder

Disposables
  • Cleaning chemicals You should have acetone, paint thinner, isopropal (rubbing) alcohol and anything else you may need to clean fiberglass and adhesives from work, brushes etc... also a mild cleaner for interiors and a hand detergent is also recommended. For hand cleaner I recommend fast orange.
  • Brushes Get as many cheap brushes as you can mainly used for 'glass (fiberglass) work I like to buy a bunch at a time to save money as you WILL need them all ie harbor freight brushes
  • Bondo spreaders/finsOnly way to spread body filler as far as I know (If you use bondo brand filler after you mix the hardener the color should be the same color as the spreader) ie spreader
  • Sand paper - you can never have enough. Get as much as you can in as many grits as you can for every sanding tool that you have and also a few sheets for hand sanding.
  • Bondo mixing board Not necessary but always a nice thing to have Bondo mixing board
  • Router bits Added by Geolemon we do use simple 30 degree and 45 degree chamfer bits, and the occasional roundover bit (we've got a bunch of radiuses of those) ...but mostly, the fabrication is done using flush trim bits, and that master bearing kit



First Aid
I haven't met a wound that electrical tape or super glue couldn't fix

Added by 77'CJ "actually, i always use neosporin, cause infection sucks, and guaze is handy on larger wounds"


Tool trucks:
You've all seen the MAC/MATco/Snap-On truck rolling around your town, not sure why but a lot of people think you need to be a "professional" wrench turner to purchase from them, this is not true. If you have money they will gladly take it from you. I have a MAC and a Snap-On account, give them your license they'll type you in the computer and you can walk home with something shiny that day, they also accept cash credit/debit and check I'm sure it varies with different dealers but the accounts I have you pay minimum 10% a week and there is NO interest (be careful though mac/snap-on is not cheap)

Manufacturers Online stores (don't forget about ebay)When I have time I will go down the list and make a quide for how every tool is used, most of these are obvious in their use but I will try to elaborate a lil more add some safety tips or anything I think anyone should know.

Last edited by sprackydoo; 09-12-2006 at 05:33 PM.
sprackydoo is offline   Reply With Quote

Old 02-01-2006, 06:58 AM   #6
Altec88

Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: UP Michigan, Sasquatch's are REAL, stop denying it.
Posts: 10,335
Altec88 has a reputation beyond reputeAltec88 has a reputation beyond reputeAltec88 has a reputation beyond reputeAltec88 has a reputation beyond reputeAltec88 has a reputation beyond reputeAltec88 has a reputation beyond reputeAltec88 has a reputation beyond reputeAltec88 has a reputation beyond reputeAltec88 has a reputation beyond reputeAltec88 has a reputation beyond reputeAltec88 has a reputation beyond repute



Good stuff spracky
Altec88 is offline   Reply With Quote

Old 02-23-2006, 05:30 AM   #7
sprackydoo

Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: "a 40oz to freedom is the only chance I have to feel good even though I feel bad" Sublime
Posts: 3,680
sprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond repute



k guys I know I have to be forgetting a few things lmk what ya got and what category to put it in
sprackydoo is offline   Reply With Quote

Old 02-26-2006, 03:22 AM   #8
geolemon

Addict
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Buffalo, NY, USA
Posts: 14,733
geolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond repute



What the!!!

Fabrication tools... fabrication supplies...

...and no mention of router bits, templates, or bearing kits?

Put down the fiberglass... there's other ways to fabricate too.
Take a peek at this:
http://www.kwbuffalo.com/gallery_2006_autoshow.php
See the Mercedes G500 pictures, with the Focal Utopia Be's and twin Audison Thesis amplifiers? Look at the hatch pictures.

Our fabricators built that curved subwoofer enclosure, with the six 8" Utopia Be subs - and even that pod that holds the Mercedes Benz star emblem - without the use of any fiberglass at all. In fact, that entire install didn't involve any fiberglassing whatsoever (where the Corvette in those pictures - there's a whole gallery on that one - was completely fiberglass fabrication ).
And those panels aren't soft - just vinyl (and Louis Vuitton suede) wrapped, with plexi and aluminum accents. They go "rap" when you knock on them.

But it DID involve a LOT of router table fabrication - you can do a TON with those techniques, and much more accurately, much more tighter fitting, tighter tolerances, finer detail.

Great job on this list so far though, I love it!
geolemon is offline   Reply With Quote

Old 02-26-2006, 03:28 AM   #9
geolemon

Addict
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Buffalo, NY, USA
Posts: 14,733
geolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond repute



Oh, for some REAL fabrication supplies, check these guys out:
www.mobilesolutions-usa.com

The owner built something like 8 or 9 of the past RF demo vehicles at CES, this year being the first exception since he's been focusing on this supply company and his training business.
We bring him in several times a year to train us on his advanced tricks...
...like the router table fabrication tricks.

Here's one "missing link", btw... the real trick (besides a flush trim bit and rabbeting bits that'll accept these) to zero-tolerance router fabrication pleasure:
http://www.mobilesolutions-usa.com/s...its.htm#master
The master bearing kit.
geolemon is offline   Reply With Quote

Old 02-26-2006, 03:35 AM   #10
sprackydoo

Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: "a 40oz to freedom is the only chance I have to feel good even though I feel bad" Sublime
Posts: 3,680
sprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond repute



Quote:
Originally Posted by geolemon
What the!!!

Fabrication tools... fabrication supplies...

...and no mention of router bits, templates, or bearing kits?

Put down the fiberglass... there's other ways to fabricate too.
Take a peek at this:
http://www.kwbuffalo.com/gallery_2006_autoshow.php
See the Mercedes G500 pictures, with the Focal Utopia Be's and twin Audison Thesis amplifiers? Look at the hatch pictures.

Our fabricators built that curved subwoofer enclosure, with the six 8" Utopia Be subs - and even that pod that holds the Mercedes Benz star emblem - without the use of any fiberglass at all. In fact, that entire install didn't involve any fiberglassing whatsoever (where the Corvette in those pictures - there's a whole gallery on that one - was completely fiberglass fabrication ).
And those panels aren't soft - just vinyl (and Louis Vuitton suede) wrapped, with plexi and aluminum accents. They go "rap" when you knock on them.

But it DID involve a LOT of router table fabrication - you can do a TON with those techniques, and much more accurately, much more tighter fitting, tighter tolerances, finer detail.

Great job on this list so far though, I love it!
Any speciffic router bit profiles? What templates do you use/is used most often or is it a "get as many as you can" thing?

Everything that's on the list is what i've run into so far. If I haven't used it I won't recommend it, which is why i'm asking for others to post up what they use why they use it any speciffic brands etc..

BTW thanks for the link my toolbox isn't completely overflowing yet unfortunately neither is my wallet

Last edited by sprackydoo; 02-26-2006 at 03:44 AM.
sprackydoo is offline   Reply With Quote

Old 02-26-2006, 03:57 AM   #11
geolemon

Addict
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Buffalo, NY, USA
Posts: 14,733
geolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond repute



Well, we do use simple 30 degree and 45 degree chamfer bits, and the occasional roundover bit (we've got a bunch of radiuses of those - look at the aluminum rack plate we built for the Thesis amps)...

...but mostly, the fabrication is done using flush trim bits, and that master bearing kit, to allow you to not only replicate patterns, but duplicate shapes exactly via a multi-step process [you could probably work out on your own] using the bearing kit and flush trim bits / rabbet bits to create undersize and oversize versions of the shapes you are tracking (hint: to account for the diameter of the first-pass flush trim bit and bring the cutout size back down proportionally ).

It's amazing how fast fabrication goes, using techniques like these, compared to the time it takes to set up and fiberglass something - not to mention the cure time and final sanding hours.

Another side-trick (if you looked at the Benz pics): laminating bendable plywood or bendable MDF.
geolemon is offline   Reply With Quote

Old 02-26-2006, 04:00 AM   #12
geolemon

Addict
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Buffalo, NY, USA
Posts: 14,733
geolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond reputegeolemon has a reputation beyond repute



Quote:
Originally Posted by sprackydoo
Any speciffic router bit profiles? What templates do you use/is used most often or is it a "get as many as you can" thing?
We do use the prebuilt templates somewhat - but mostly, we make our own templates based on needs - templates built from tracking a flush trim bit on products themselves - that's "exact".

Check out that Fukuda router shield that they sell.
The picture that illustrates the shield shows them doing just that - making a template off a particular speaker.
geolemon is offline   Reply With Quote

Old 07-13-2006, 07:46 AM   #13
Murph.

Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 8
Murph. will become famous soon enough



Very nice list. I would like to add a cool site I use for the small stuff.
www.thetoolwarehouse.net

They have the same stuff some of the tool truck use at a lower price.
Murph. is offline   Reply With Quote

Old 09-11-2006, 11:21 PM   #14
Robster13

Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Pet Cemetery
Posts: 3,275
Robster13 has a reputation beyond reputeRobster13 has a reputation beyond reputeRobster13 has a reputation beyond reputeRobster13 has a reputation beyond reputeRobster13 has a reputation beyond reputeRobster13 has a reputation beyond reputeRobster13 has a reputation beyond reputeRobster13 has a reputation beyond reputeRobster13 has a reputation beyond reputeRobster13 has a reputation beyond reputeRobster13 has a reputation beyond repute



What is a "wire insertion tool" used for? I've aquired most of these hand tools, and have used most of them already, but I am just wondering what it enables me to do, or what it makes easier.
(Sorry for the run-on sentence there...)
Robster13 is offline   Reply With Quote

Old 09-12-2006, 05:26 PM   #15
sprackydoo

Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: "a 40oz to freedom is the only chance I have to feel good even though I feel bad" Sublime
Posts: 3,680
sprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond reputesprackydoo has a reputation beyond repute



Quote:
Originally Posted by Robster13
What is a "wire insertion tool" used for? I've aquired most of these hand tools, and have used most of them already, but I am just wondering what it enables me to do, or what it makes easier.
(Sorry for the run-on sentence there...)
It helps a lot on some cars for getting wire through the firewall (like through an empty rubber grommet or along the factory wiring) It's a hollow tube with a angled and sharpened end.

Push the cutting side through the grommet.

Put the wire through the handle

go on the engine side of the firewall and pull the wire to whatever length you need.

Pull the wire insertion tool out of the grommet and the rubber will pull tight to the wire. BAM done
sprackydoo is offline   Reply With Quote

Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 02:05 AM.
Powered by vBulletin® - Copyright © 2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 1996 - 2011 by CarAudioForum.com - all rights reserved.